Be Going To Statements ESL Games, Activities and Worksheets

Be Going To Practice

ESL Be Going To Statements Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Matching, Underlining, Gap-fill, Writing Answers - Speaking Activity: Freer Practice - Elementary (A1-A2) - 30 minutes

This be going to worksheet helps students practice positive and negative be going to statements. First, students match be going to sentences with their functions and answer grammar questions about the structure. Next, students match sentence halves together to form be going to statements. After that, students complete sentences by underlining the correct verb forms. Students then complete a text with verbs from a box and the correct form of be going to. Students then move on to plan a holiday to a place they would like to visit by answering questions using be going to. However, students must not name the place in their sentences. Finally, students ask a partner the same questions and try to guess where they are going on holiday.
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What are they going to do?
 

First Day of Work

ESL Be Going To Statements Game - Grammar: Gap-fill, Guessing, Forming Sentences - Pair Work - Elementary (A1-A2) - 25 minutes

In this free be going to guessing game, students create clues for jobs that people are going to do for a partner to guess. To begin, students complete clues for each person's job using be going to and the verbs provided. In pairs, students then take it in turns to read their clues to their partner who has to guess what job each person is going to do by making a sentence. If their partner says the be going to sentence shown in bold, the student puts a tick. The student with the most correct guesses at the end of the game wins.
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What are they going to do?

ESL Be Going To Statements Activity - Speaking: Information Gap, Making Statements, Identifying, Controlled Practice - Pair Work - Elementary (A1-A2) - 30 minutes

In this be going to speaking activity, students find pairs of friends by describing people's weekend plans using is going to and isn't going to. In pairs, students take it in turns to tell their partner what a person from the worksheet is and isn't going to do at the weekend. A thumbs-up indicates that the person is going to do the activity and a thumbs-down shows what the person isn't going to do, e.g. 'Alex is going to do his homework'. Their partner listens and fills in the blanks on their worksheet with the activities, putting a tick or cross accordingly. When the students have completed both worksheets with activities, they compare each person's list of activities to find pairs of people who are going to do the same things, writing each person's friend's name as indicated.
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What are they going to do?
 

How to Use Be Going To

ESL Going To Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Gap-fill, Writing Sentences from Prompts, Answering Questions - Speaking Activity: Freer Practice - Group Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

This fun be going to worksheet helps to teach students how to use be going to for future plans, intentions and predictions. To begin, students read about the functions of be going to and look at examples of how the be going to structure is used and formed. Students then complete a dialogue to practice the structure. Next, students practice making predictions with be going to based on present evidence. After that, students think about what they are going to be like in the year 2050. Students then make sentences about their future using be going to for future plans, intentions and predictions. Finally, students work in groups of three or four and tell their group members what they think they are going to be like in the future.
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I'm going to improve my English

ESL Be Going To Statements Activity - Grammar Exercise: Writing Sentences from Prompts - Speaking Activity: Brainstorming, Discussion, Freer Practice - Group Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

In this free be going to speaking activity, students talk about future intentions by discussing ways to improve their English. In groups, students brainstorm and discuss how they can improve their English in six categories, e.g. speaking, listening, writing, etc. Students then choose the best three ideas for each category and each student notes these down on their worksheet. Working alone, students then choose six things that they are going to do to improve their English, choosing one idea from each category and writing a sentence with be going to, e.g. 'I'm going to speak English for one hour a day'. Next, students pair up with someone from another group. The pairs of students compare their ideas and give reasons for their choices. Finally, there is a class feedback session to find out which were the most popular ideas for improving English skills.
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Let's Party!

ESL Be Going To Statements Activity - Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking: Matching, Answering Questions, Writing Sentences, Presenting - Group Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

In this be going to activity, students plan a party and then present their plans to the class. To begin, students match vocabulary to questions about planning a party. Then, in groups, students plan a party by answering ten be going to questions on the worksheet using the party vocabulary from the first exercise to help them answer each question. Students write their answers in sentence form using be going to. When each group has planned their party, they present their party idea to the class by reading their sentences. The class then votes for the best one.
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What am I going to do?

ESL Going To Statements Game - Grammar: Making Sentences, Guessing - Pair Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 25 minutes

In this be going to statements game, students give clues about planned activities by saying what they are going to do beforehand. In pairs, students take it in turns to pick up a card and tell their partner one thing they are going to do before they start doing the planned activity on the card, e.g. 'I’m going to read my textbook'. Their partner then tries to guess what they are going to do next, e.g. 'You are going to have an exam'. If their partner guesses correctly, they keep the card. If their partner guesses incorrectly, the student gives them up to three more clues. If their partner still cannot give the right answer, the student keeps the card. The student with the most cards at the end of the game is the winner.
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What's in the bag?

ESL Be Going To Game - Grammar: Forming Sentences - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 25 minutes

Here is an amusing be going to statements game to help students practice talking about intentions. Students sit in a circle and pass a bag to each other. The student who receives the bag looks inside. The student who passed the bag then invents something unusual or bizarre that could be inside and asks a 'Why have you got ... in your bag?' question to the student, e.g. 'Why have you got a monkey in your bag?' The other student quickly thinks of an appropriate reason and responds using be going to, e.g. 'I'm going to take it to the zoo'. Students are out of the game if they make a grammar mistake, can't think of an appropriate reason, repeat an answer given by another student, or take too long to reply. The last student left in the game wins.
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You're going to...

ESL Be Going To Game - Grammar: Miming, Guessing, Forming Sentences - Group Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

In this entertaining be going to game, students watch mimes and guess what is going to happen next by making be going to statements. A player from one team comes to the front of the class and is given a card. The player mimes the actions they would do in preparation for the planned activity marked on the card, but they don't do the activity itself. Instead, they stop just before and say, "What am I going to do next?" The player's team then consults before answering using the phrase 'You're going to...' If the player's team answers correctly, they score two points. If the player's team gives the wrong answer, the other team is allowed to guess for one point. Then, a player from the other team comes to the front of the class and so on. The team with the highest score at the end of the game wins.
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